Patient Education

Absolutely NO eating or drinking for at least 6 hours before your procedure!

Procedure may have to be cancelled or delayed if the proper preparation instructions aren't followed below.

Please read the following information to prepare for your procedure day with Dr. Khurana. Please don't hesitate to contact us with any questions!

UPPer GI ENdoscopy

what is an upper gi endoscopy?

An upper GI endoscopy is a procedure where Dr. Khurana uses an endoscope (a flexible tube with a camera) to view the entire esophagus and upper GI tract. He can see abnormalities, like inflammation, ulcers, and bleeding, through the endoscope that don't show up well on x-rays. He can also insert instruments into the scope to treat bleeding abnormalities or remove samples of tissue (biopsy) for further tests. The scope blows air into the stomach to expand the folds of tissue and make it easier to examine the stomach lining.

Possible complications of upper endoscopy include bleeding and puncture of the stomach lining. However, such complications are rare. Most children will probably have nothing more than a mild sore throat after the procedure.

preparing for the procedure

The stomach and duodenum must be empty for the procedure to be thorough and safe. The patient should not eat or drink anything for at least 6 hours before the procedure time. This usually means nothing to eat or drink after midnight the day before. Dr. Khurana may also give other special instructions.

on procedure day

The procedure will require the patient to be sedated. Right before the procedure, the anesthesiologist will examine the child and will discuss the different kinds of anesthesia he/she will be using. This depends on the child's age, their past medical history and physical examination at the time.

The procedure takes 20 to 30 minutes for an upper GI endoscopy and about an hour for a colonoscopy. Because child will be sedated, he or she will need to rest at the endoscopy facility for 1 to 2 hours until the medication wears off. Dr. Khurana will discuss findings and preliminary impressions with the family. If a biopsy is done, a follow-up appointment to discuss biopsy results will be made.

Colonoscopy

What is a Colonoscopy?

A colonoscopy is a procedure where Dr. Khurana uses an colonoscope (a flexible tube with a camera) to view the lower GI tract, primarily the colon. He can see abnormalities, like inflammation, ulcers, and bleeding, through the colonoscope that don't show up well on x-rays. He can also insert instruments into the scope to treat bleeding abnormalities or remove samples of tissue (biopsy) for further tests. The scope blows air into the colon to expand the folds of tissue and make it easier to examine the stomach lining.

Possible complications of colonoscopy include bleeding and puncture of the intestinal lining. However, such complications are rare.

Preparing for the Procedure

The preparation for colonscopy depends on the child's age. It is important that the instructions are followed exactly or the procedure may be canceled.

If you have any problems with the preparation, please call the office at (623)-825-5200. After office hours, call the office to contact the Pediatric GI provider on call.

Note: If your child is taking prescribed medications, please discuss with your child's physician.


Newborn - 18 months

Starting 2:00 p.m. the day before the procedure, do not give your child any solids or formula.

For dinner the day before and the morning of, give your child only clear, non-red liquids (Pedialyte, broth, Jell-O, juice, popsicles).

The night before the procedure, give your child Fleet's BabyLax Enema. Your pharmacy may need to order the enema.


18 months - 4 years

For 3 days before the procedure, give your child large amounts of fluids, especially fruit juice, along with regular meals.

For 1.5 days before the procedure, give your child only clear, non-red liquids (broth, Jell-O, juice, and popsicles). Solid foods and milk products are NOT allowed 1.5 days before the procedure.

At 2:00 pm the day before the procedure, give your child 1⁄4 bottle (a bottle is 10 ounces) of chilled Magnesium Citrate. Either cherry or lemon-lime flavored is acceptable. (Children usually prefer the cherry flavor.) This is acceptable even though it is red. The child should drink the Magnesium Citrate within 20 minutes.

At 7:00 p.m. the day before the procedure, give another 1⁄4 bottle. The child’s stools should be watery and clear by 10:00 p.m.

The day of the procedure, the child should have nothing to eat or drink after 3:00 a.m. that morning.


4 years - 8 years

Several days before the procedure, give your child plenty of fluids along with regular meals.

For 2 days before the procedure, your child may have a normal breakfast and lunch. After lunch, your child may consume only clear, non-red liquids (broth, Jell-O, juice, and Popsicles).

Starting 2 days before the procedure, give your child one 5 mg Dulcolax tablet every afternoon. The child must swallow the pill, not chew it. Solid foods and milk products are not allowed after lunch, or until the procedure is completed.

At 2:00 p.m. the day before the procedure, give the child 1⁄2 bottle (a bottle is 10 ounces) of chilled Magnesium Citrate. Either cherry or lemon-lime flavored is acceptable. (Children usually prefer the cherry flavor.) This is acceptable even though it is red. The child should drink the Magnesium Citrate within 20 minutes.

At 7:00 p.m. the day before the procedure, give another 1⁄4 bottle of Magnesium Citrate. The child’s stools should be watery and clear by 10:00 p.m.


8 years - 18 years

Several days before the procedure, give your child plenty of fluids along with regular meals.

For 2 days before the procedure, your child may have a normal breakfast and lunch. After lunch, your child may consume only clear, non-red liquids (broth, Jell-O, juice, and Popsicles).

Starting 2 days before the procedure, give your child one 10 mg Dulcolax tablet every afternoon. The child must swallow the pill, not chew it. Solid foods and milk products are not allowed after lunch, or until the procedure is completed.

At 2:00 p.m. the day before the procedure, give the child 1 bottle (a bottle is 10 ounces) of chilled Magnesium Citrate. Either cherry or lemon-lime flavored is acceptable. (Children usually prefer the cherry flavor.) This is acceptable even though it is red. The child should drink the Magnesium Citrate within 20 minutes.

At 7:00 p.m. the day before the procedure, give another 1 bottle of Magnesium Citrate. The child’s stools should be watery and clear by 10:00 p.m.


On procedure day

The procedure will require the patient to be sedated. Right before the procedure, the anesthesiologist will examine the child and will discuss the different kinds of anesthesia he/she will be using. This depends on the child's age, their past medical history and physical examination at the time.

The procedure takes 20 to 30 minutes for an upper GI endoscopy and about an hour for a colonoscopy. Because child will be sedated, he or she will need to rest at the endoscopy facility for 1 to 2 hours until the medication wears off. Dr. Khurana will discuss findings and preliminary impressions with the family. If a biopsy is done, a follow-up appointment to discuss biopsy results will be made.